Pest Issues that affect your lawn by Seamus Dillon

For those of us that have properties to maintain in Muskegon and Ottawa counties, there is a new pest called, “hemlock woolly adelgid or HWA”. This is a tiny insect and feeds on the sap of the hemlock trees. These small creatures can kill a hemlock in only 4 years. The best way to recognize an attack by this pest is to look for a white cottony mass attached to the twigs at the base of the needles. It is best to check with your local Landscape expert for more help or proper diagnosis or go to www.michigan.gov/HWA #ihatepests

twitterlinkedin

Where did this Fungi come from? by Seamus Dillon

There are two general ways this can happen. Primarily Fungi visit our landscape beds and lawns due to weather conditions. Secondarily, however the lack of nutrients, organic matter, air and water proportioned in the proper percentages can accelerate the Fungi. Lately in Western Michigan, we have had ideal conditions for Fungi to grow. The best way to combat this and keep your expensive landscape protected is to use protective treatments that prevent Fungi to grow. Also, it is best to keep the immune system of the tree, shrub or plant as healthy as possible. Insect infestation can hurt the immune system as well causing the susceptibility of a disease. Overall it is best to take all of this into consideration when caring for your lawn. #Fungitakesover

twitterlinkedin

How much mulch do I really need? By Seamus Dillon

Well, first we need to determine if it is best to use bark mulch or dyed wood chips. It really depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you simply want to suppress weeds and have your landscape look new all the time, then likely you’ll want bark chips spread twice per year. The first time to lay them would be early spring and then again in early fall. This can get expensive however. An alternative that can look nice all year is to use Premium hardwood bark mulch. There are mixed reviews on the best time to spread it, but overall it will decompose faster and has many more nutrients for your shrubs and plants. Typically, a 2 to 3-inch base is sufficient, then each year an inch to spruce your landscape beds are really all you need. #barkmulch

twitterlinkedin